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Presentation to the MacDonald College

 

I was anxious to show it to my gliding associates at Canadair : Witold Kasprzyk and Fred Bodek. Surprisingly, they approved, Kasper became an instant enthusiast.

 

In no time, he imported aircraft quality plywood from Finland and cleaned up his basement in preparation for construction. We adopted the BKB-1 designation after our first letters. It was winter of 1956.

 

We notified the D.O.T. and had an official inspector designated. I spent many long evenings catching up with the drawings and the stress report. Parts were already being made.

 

In the spring, we had the wings on the jigs, leading edges upwards, partly skinned with plywood. Then came the springtime deluge. The Cartierville (Montreal) basement flooded above the trailing edges of our wings.

 

In the spring, we had the wings on the jigs, leading edges upwards, partly skinned with plywood. Then came the springtime deluge. The Cartierville (Montreal) basement flooded above the trailing edges of our wings. I shall not elaborate on the concept nor details of this little sailplane. It was described at the OSTIV Symposium in Cologne in 1960 in my name by the late Bev Shenstone. Subsequently, the articles and design data were published in Swiss Aero Revue (Nov. 1960, May 1961), in the world's sailplanes 1963 and Jane's Airplanes of the World.

 

Just before completion of the BKB, my partners first Kasprzyk and several years later Bodek, migrated to the United States (Boeing) in search of better jobs. On parting, we decided that the glider would remain in Canada for the initial flying, then it would be shipped to the States.

 

The flight tests started in Sept. 1959 under the experimental licence CF-ZBK-X. Initially, the glider was flown from Pendelton, Ontario where we were fortunate to have paved runways.

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