A A A

Historia BKB

 

Not much was heard about the BKB in the years following 1965, the last dated correspondence from Kasper. Soaring Magazine listed the BKB as designed by Stefan Brochocki and manufactured by the partnership in its May 1964 Directory of Active Sailplanes in the United States. It appeared that Kasper's design claims were either forgotten or generally disbelieved. However the Directory did mention that both Kasper and his test pilot, Al Wilson were individually working on their own designs based on the BKB.

 

Curtis McPhail, a pilot for Northwest Airlines, was killed in a crash in 1971 while piloting the BKB at Canaday Airport in Arlington, Washington. The story was reported in the Seattle Glider Council publication, Towline, and mentioned a brief history of the glider and the partnership that developed it. Stefan Brochocki was devastated at the loss of life. He tried to obtain details of the crash but nothing was received from Kasper. To this day he has been unable to ascertain the cause of the accident and subsequent loss of the pilot's life. He has never come to terms with it. Accidents can be expected in a risky sport, and somehow one can deal with them. But being left in the dark about the details is haunting and leaves no peace of mind in the long run. (TWITT library has provided one version of details of the crash.).

 

More stories began to surface about Kasper's claims regarding the BKB. In the Post-Intelligencer ( date & location unknown), he claims to be the developer of the control system and the "elevons", special adaptations of the wing designed by Brochocki. He makes further and greater claims in Soaring (Nov 1969) despite the magazine's previously- published crediting of the design to Brochocki. Lengthy articles were featured in US Sport Aviation Magazine (July 1973, Flight Testing the Bekas-N) and Canadian Sport Aviation Magazine (Spring 1984, Remarkable L/D Achieved by Short-span Tailless Sailplane) repeated in great detail Kasper's claims to the unique design of the BKB. Stefan wrote to publishers of the latter to set the record straight and was ignored.